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  • By Admin
  • 22 September 2017

PROVIDING SAFE CARE AND TREATMENT USING PPE


Personal protective equipment. Personal protective equipment – known as ‘PPE’ – is used to protect health care workers while performing specific tasks that might involve them coming into contact with blood or body fluids that may contain some infectious agents (germs)


WHAT IS PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT IN HEALTHCARE?


Personal protective equipment, or PPE, as defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, is “specialized clothing or equipment, worn by an employee for protection against infectious materials.”


WHY DO WE USE PPE IN HEALTHCARE?


This barrier reduces the chance of touching, being exposed to, and spreading germs. Personal protective equipment (PPE) helps prevent the spread of germs in the hospital. This can protect people and health care workers from infections


WHAT IS PPE IN HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE?


PPE is equipment that will protect the user against health or safety risks at work. It can include items such as safety helmets, gloves, eye protection, high-visibility clothing, safety footwear and safety harnesses. It also includes respiratory protective equipment (RPE).


HOW DO YOU PUT ON PPE?


  • 1.Identify hazards & manage risk. Gather the necessary PPE. …
  • 2.Put on gloves (over cuff).
  • 3.Put on a gown.
  • 4.Step 3a. Put on the face shield.
  • 5.Avoid contamination of self, others & the environment. Remove the most heavily contaminated items first.
  • 6.Perform hand hygiene.
  • 7.Perform hand hygiene.
  • 8.Step 3b. Put on medical mask and eye protection


WHAT IS CONSIDERED PPE FOR INFECTION CONTROL?


For communicable disease exposure, PPE is specialized clothing or equipment used to prevent contact with hazardous substances. Its use is an integral part of infection control and prevention measures that protect workers from exposure to blood, body fluids, and other potentially infectious materials


Regulation 12: Safe care and treatment Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 states that providers must prevent and control the spread of infection. Where the responsibility for care and treatment is shared, care planning must be timely to maintain people’s health, safety and welfare.


The Department of Health has issued the Health and Social Care Act 2008: Code of Practice for health and adult social care on the prevention and control of infections and related guidance and every care provider must have a copy of this Code of Practice available for all staff to refer to.


Additionally, all new care staff are also expected during their first six months of employment to undertake and complete the Care Certificate and one of the 15 units in the Certificate is Infection Prevention and Control staff.


The point of wearing gloves and aprons is the prevention of cross infection as the care worker moves from service user to service user and also to protect the care worker.


There must be a policy and risk assessments in place if you decide not to use gloves and aprons, but this will be part of your wider policy and procedure on the prevention and control of infection.


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